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When King Arthur got a stone stuck in his shoe, he hurled the troublesome object a whopping 11 miles, from Llanelli to the Gower Peninsula - or so the story goes.

Arthurs Stone

Arthurs Stone

Sweynes Howes

Sweynes Howes

Known as Arthur’s Stone (Maen Ceti in Welsh), the boulder in question - weighing 25 tons - sits atop Cefn Bryn, a majestic ancient ridge dotted with wild ponies, which in ancient times was the site for mysterious ceremonies and rituals. Follow in the footsteps of Henry VII who, in the 15th century, made a 128km detour to see Arthur’s Stone on his way to the Battle of Bosworth. There are several other stone formations to look out for - Rhossili Downs is the site of Sweynes Howes - said to be the resting place of Swansea’s Viking namesake, King Sweyne Forkbeard.

Rhosili

Rhosili

Vast and breath-taking, Rhossili Bay has featured in a list of the world’s top ten beaches. It’s witnessed its fair share of drama, evidenced by the semi-sunken remains of the Helvetia that poke out of the sand like the bones of a giant fish. On the night of 31 October 1887, the Norwegian barque was driven by gale force winds onto the bay, losing its cargo and eventually being stripped of all that was valuable; its skeleton has remained here for 130 years. From Rhossili - at low tide only - it’s a thrilling walk to Worm’s Head, the site of a more recent legendary tale when Swansea-native Dylan Thomas was stranded on the island for a night, cut off from the mainland by the fast-rising tide: always check tide times before crossing!

Rhosili

Rhosili