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Pembrokeshire Coast Path

Pembrokeshire Coast Path

Carving a route through the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park’s stunning natural landscape, the Pembrokeshire Coast Path is legendary; National Geographic magazine rated it the world’s second best long-distance path.

Strumble Head

Strumble Head

It’s 186 miles long, passes 58 beaches and has 35,000ft of ascent and descent - the equivalent of climbing Everest. You don’t have to do it all at once though, and there’s an excellent shuttle bus system in place. Dip in for a spectacular sunset at Strumble Head, conveniently connected to St Davids and Fishguard by shuttle bus. Nearby Melin Tregwynt is worth a visit; the 18th century woollen mill uses traditional methods to make luxurious blankets, cushions, and throws that are loved by hip hotels and design-led stores; buy a snuggly piece of Welsh heritage to take home.

Coasteering

Coasteering

Want to physically connect with the landscape? Try coasteering, a sport pioneered in Pembrokeshire. Requiring nerves of steel for the initial jump - off a cliff - coasteering involves getting around a coastline through any means possible, including jumping, scrambling, caving and swimming. It’s high-octane and incredibly addictive!

Fresh Waterwest

Freshwater West

Film-makers find our beaches, towns and villages inspiring. Ridley Scott chose Freshwater West to film battle scenes featuring hundreds of horses in Robin Hood, and the same location featured in the last two Harry Potter films. Head inland to Pembroke; the castle and town featured extensively in the recent hit Me Before You, and visit quaint, artists’ haven Tenby, which starred in The Edge of Love - look out for historic St Catherine’s Island, just off Tenby, in the 2017 outing of Sherlock...

Tenby

Tenby